Sunday, 17 June 2007

WHY Shizen-nou? (1)





After graduating from Tsukuba University, I went to Melbourne to teach Japanese language and culture at secondary school level. Because of my father’s work, from early childhood until I left home to study at university I was always surrounded by international students, who had a healthy appetite for learning about all aspects of Japan. My parents took good care of these students, and tried to treat them as members of the family. Continuous encounter with new and unknown lives outside Japan was an invigorating experience, and even though I was only a small child, I was proud to be their ‘teacher’, telling them about Japan. In hindsight, becoming a language teacher was something of a natural path. I wanted to introduce the ‘real’ Japan to the world, not only fuji-yama, sushi, geisha – later replaced by manga, anime, zen – but the multitude of other beautiful things Japan can offer.

After teaching for seven years, I moved to London. By then, I was ready to change my career. Although I am still heavily involved in education, my interests and focus has shifted to people from my own country. I want to help Japanese people learn more about Japan through the study-abroad experience. This may sound paradoxical, but from my own experience I learn more about my own culture by being overseas. Living abroad has the effect of broadening the mind outwards and inwards. Without realising, you explore deeper your internal world, raising questions about your own existence, your cultural values, and so on. I have always believed that encounter with things foreign is a wonderful way of discovering who you are.

In ten years of living overseas, I have met many Japanese desperate to escape from Japanese society, who somehow treat Japanese as a second citizenship of the developed world. Their bitterness and cynicism are saddening. There are so many beautiful things in Japan! The sentenced has echoed repeatedly in my mind. How can one be a global citizen without pride in your own culture?

なぜ自然農?(1)

筑波大学卒業後、日本語と日本文化を教える目的で単身オーストラリアに渡りました。メルボルンにある州立の中高一貫教育校にて、現地職員としての採用でした。幼少より大学進学に際して家を出るまで、父親の仕事の関係から、常に留学生が身近にいるという環境で育ちました。国費留学生であった彼らは、日本の全ての事柄に対し、あくなき探究心でもって臨んでいました。両親は留学生の面倒をよく見、家族の一員のように接していたという記憶があります。彼らを媒体に伝えられる、日本を越えた新しい未知の世界との出会いは、私にとってまさに新鮮そのものでした。また、幼かったにもかかわらず、彼らの「先生」として日本について語るという行為に得意満面でした。思い返してみると、日本語教師になったことは自然な流れだったのかもしれません。フジヤマ、スシ、ゲイシャ、後のマンガ、アニメ、ゼンといった分りやすい文化だけではなく、日常の隅々に溢れる美しい日本を、海外に向けて発信していきたいと思いました。

メルボルンで7年間教鞭をとった後、ロンドンに移住しました。この頃には、日本語教師という仕事から移行する心構えが出来ていました。教育には関わり続けるつもりでしたが、その対象が海外の人から日本人へと移ったためです。海外留学を通して、日本についての理解を深めるという事業の一環を担えたらと思いました。逆説的に捉えられるかもしれませんが、自身の経験から、海外での生活を体験することにより、自国の文化について更に学ぶことができたからです。異文化での生活は、個人の思考を内と外の双方に広げる結果を生みます。気づかないうちに、自己の心の奥底の世界を探求し、自己存在や価値観について反芻し始めます。慣れ親しんだ概念外の物事に触れることは、自分自身について新たに発見する、素晴らしい機会になり得ます。

10年近くを海外で過ごす間に、どういう訳か日本を途上国の二流市民だと認識し、日本社会からの脱却を望む人々に数多く出会いました。日本への、苦々しく、悲観的な態度を目の当たりにするのは、とても悲しいものです。日本の美点はたくさんあります。自国の文化を誇れないものが、果たしてグローバル市民になれるのか。この疑問を、何度も心の中で繰り返し続けました。

1 comment:

Satoko Shibata said...

Hi Satoko-san,

It was really nice to know your wonderful blog about natural farming using Shizen-nou. Also it's great to know your backgrounds and how you feel about Japan. As I was reading this, I realised how important it is to understand our own culture values as well as conveying Japanese culture to outside world. I feel like I regret that I didn't tell English people much about beautiful things in Japan when I was staying in England. So I've decided I will have some knowledge about Japanese culture and will prepare to talk about that until I back in England again.